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Sunspel and Katie Scott’s Soft-floral Collaboration References the Nature of California and England

The floral prints represent the greenery of California and the flora around Long Eaton. 

Sunspel and Katie Scott’s Soft-floral Collaboration References the Nature of California and England

Sunspel x Katie Scott

LONDON — Sunspel has partnered with Katie Scott, a London-based contemporary botanical artist for a limited summer collection for women and men.

The pieces come in two floral prints in green and gray, as well as black and gray, both of which were illustrated by Scott to represent the floral elements behind the British label’s story, from the fauna of California, where their Supima cotton is grown, and plants local to their factory in Long Eaton, near Nottingham, where most of their manufacturing takes place.  

“We love working with British artists and designers and thought Katie’s modern take on botanical drawings could work really nicely on our product. Botanical drawings are already very British, but Katie’s contemporary take on them works really well with our contemporary British brand ethos,” said David Telfer, Sunspel’s creative director. 

Sunspel and Katie Scott’s Soft-floral Collaboration References the Nature of California and England

The artist has previously collaborated with Nike and Soho House. Her botanical work tends to be colorful and bold.

“For this collaboration we worked with a very detailed and delicate line-drawing style and some calm color pallets that are in keeping with the Sunspel brand. I think it works very well,” Scott said.

The men’s range includes short-sleeved button-down shirts, matching swim trunks and T-shirts. The tops are also available for women along with silk drawstring trousers, an item that Sunspel is best known for since it was founded in 1860 by Thomas A. Hill. 

Sunspel and Katie Scott’s Soft-floral Collaboration References the Nature of California and England

“It was a really nice process of initially seeing drawings of the individual plants and then seeing them become a repeat print. Each individual element is so lovely but collectively they become even more interesting,” Telfer said.